Better Landscape Photos With One Simple Trick

unduhan-36Landscape photography is probably the most popular genre, and for good reason. There is no lack of subject matter. It’s generally easy to access. And it’s fun to explore the world in which we live and document it with our cameras.

Of course, every photographer wants to improve his or her work, and landscape photographers are no exception. Though there is a seemingly endless array of tips and tricks that you can use to improve your landscape photos, there is one that stands out as being highly impactful, yet really simple to implement: leading lines.

Let’s explore a few reasons why leading lines are such a great addition to your landscape photos.

The short answer is that lines draw viewers deeper into the image. Think of lines as a little visual highway that directs people’s eyes through the shot. Lines help the eye explore the photo from foreground to middle ground to background, giving viewers a better understanding of how each area of the photograph relates to the others. What’s more, leading lines can also help

The Ocean Photographed Like This Before

unduhan-35Brian Bielmann

The incredible image above was taken by world class photographer Brian Bielmann off the coast of Hawaii. The image was created to help Brian celebrate 40 years of being a surf photographer. I think we can all agree that the image is compelling in more ways than one!

But as Brian has discovered, even the best still images can be made better by adding motion to them. As we introduced in an earlier article, there is a new web cloud-based platform that has allowed Brian and other photographers from around the globe to easily add motion graphics to their still images. That platform is Plotagraph

As you can see above, Plotagraph allows you to add dynamic looping content to a single still image. There’s no messing about with multiple still images or videos – you upload one still image and use Plotagraph’s easy-to-use interface to add layers, crop the image, feather edges, and a whole host of other advanced controls. I think you will agree that the results are quite incredible! What was

Wait for Golden Hour

We all know that Golden Hour light is just about the best light you can use for portrait photography. The problem, of course, is that it’s not always possible to get up at the crack of dawn or hang around until just before sunset to take the portraits you need.

But, as Mark Wallace of AdoramaTV explains in the video below, you don’t have to wait for Golden Hour because you can just fake it! All you really need are a few essentials: a flash, orange gel, and a variable neutral density filter, and you’ll be able to replicate the warm, soft glow of golden hour light each and every time. Have a look at the video and see just how easy it is!

It used to be that stock photography sites were really only for professional photographers. For the everyday amateur, the professional-level gear and training needed to take top-notch stock photos was simply out of reach. But that simply isn’t the case anymore. There is an insatiable need for stock images in today’s image-heavy world, so stock photography websites have opened their doors to all levels of photographers with all sorts of

Leave at Home as hotographers

Let’s face it – photographers have tons of gear. Even if you’re just headed out for the afternoon to take a few casual photos, you’ve still got a laundry list of items that you will definitely need. In addition to that, there’s an even longer list of items that you may or may not need for that particular shoot.

It’s a lot to keep track of, so to be sure you’re as prepared as can be for your next photo shoot, consider this list of 12 essentials you simply can’t leave at home.

Small Tripod

There are times when you need a full-sized tripod to get the job done. But there are plenty of other times when a small tripod is more than sufficient. Though there are tons of miniature tripods out there, one of our favorites is HandlePod.

The beauty of HandlePod is that you can use it in a variety of ways. Shoot hands-free by attaching it to a fencepost or another stationary object using the built-in elastic cord. Hold HandlePod in your hand and use it as a stabilizing grip for low-light photos or

Planning Stages in Photography

Getting a photography business up and going is a daunting task. There are likely many questions to be had, from how to write a contract to how to market yourself to the most fundamental step, how to write a basic business plan. Diving into business for yourself is certainly a long process, but with a good measure of patience and the right tools at your disposal, you can make a successful career for yourself.

To get you started off on the right foot, we’ve put together this list of four crucial business-building steps that will help you put together a plan for success.

Your first task when building your photography business is to develop a clear pathway for getting your business started and then maintaining that business in both the short and the long term. A business plan allows you to do that.

Essentially, a business plan is a written document in which you outline every aspect of your business. In it, you list the products and services you intend to offer, including the type of photography you’ll be doing (i.e. portraiture, landscapes, fine art, etc.). Also included in the business plan

Your Kit Lens is Actually Kind of Awesome

Ask any photographer worth his or her salt, and they will say that the single most important piece of equipment they have is their lens. It’s certainly more important than a tripod, a set of filters, or other accessories. It’s even more important than the camera you use. In fact, a good lens that’s properly cared for will last much longer than a camera body. That’s why professional photographers spend their money on good glass first and a good camera second.

However, though kit lenses get poo-pooed as being cheap (which they are), that doesn’t mean that the instant you buy a new camera that you have to find the best possible lens. In fact, kit lenses can be pretty awesome if you give them a chance.

Read on for three reasons why your kit lens isn’t quite as bad as you might think.

One thing is for sure – kit lenses challenge you to be better. Kit lenses don’t have the best optics. They often lack many features of higher-end lenses. Their focal length is usually in the arena of 18-55mm, so you really lack the focal length to take photos

Photography Tips

It’s hard not to enjoy the beauty of nature and wildlife. Even animals that are fairly common in your area can be fun to watch and great subjects for wildlife photos. Of course, the problem with photographing wildlife is if you’ve never done it before, it can be difficult to know where to start. After all, it’s the basic fundamentals that will help you build a solid foundation for wildlife photography success.

Steve Perry is a long-time wildlife photographer, and he offers up 10 essential wildlife photography tips in the short video below. Each tip addresses the basics of photographing wildlife such that when you have an opportunity to capture an image of a wild animal, you’ll have the knowledge and skills to do so. Have a look, and learn what you can do to be a more successful wildlife photographer.

You’ve done all the hard work of getting there early and painstakingly setting up the ideal shot. Then what happens? Another photographer gets up in your space to try and replicate the shot you’ve tried so hard to get. What’s even worse is when the offender proclaims that they’re a photographer too and that you should check out

Monetize Your Copyrighted Images

Over the last few weeks, we’ve been discussing image copyrights. In previous articles, we hit on the facts about copyrights and myths about copyrights. We’ve also discussed how to protect your images from being stolen and what to do in case someone uses one of your images without permission.

Now we move on to the subject of monetizing your images. In the past, amateur and enthusiast photographers relied on stock photography sites or selling prints locally to make money off their photos. But now, there’s a new way for you to make money off of your images that could prove to be quite lucrative. Let’s look at each avenue of selling your images in more depth.

It used to be that stock photography sites were really only for professional photographers. For the everyday amateur, the professional-level gear and training needed to take top-notch stock photos was simply out of reach. But that simply isn’t the case anymore. There is an insatiable need for stock images in today’s image-heavy world, so stock photography websites have opened their doors to all levels of photographers with all sorts of cameras, from iPhones on up.

Simple Tricks Spice Up Your Photos

Whether you’re just starting out as a photographer or you’ve been doing it for many years, there is always room to learn and grow. What’s more, there are always some interesting tricks out there that can help you spice up your photos and create something that’s a touch more interesting than the photos you normally take.

In that spirit, the Cooperative of Photography (COOPH) created the video below, in which they highlight nine easy-to-use tricks that will give your photos that extra bit of pop. Whether it’s using perspective to make objects look bigger, making your own DIY macro lens, or learning how to create bokeh, the video below has some excellent tips that will help you take your photos to another level. Check it out!

If you take portraits, a collapsible reflector will be one of your top tools. Many reflectors come in a 5-in-1 kit with various colors that give you different types and intensities of light, including gold and silver. Even better, you can use a black reflector to add shadowing or a white reflector to diffuse light, all of which fold up into a tidy package that’s easy to carry.

Annoying Kinds of Photographers

If you’ve taken a reasonable number of photos in your life at any popular destination, the chances are that you’ve encountered a photographer that just rubbed you the wrong way. Maybe they talked incessantly. Perhaps they tried to copy your photo. The might have even tried to teach you a thing or two without you asking them to do so.

Or, even worse, maybe the annoying photographer is you.

Either way, Tony and Chelsea Northrup feel that it’s important that we all understand the most fundamental annoyances so we can avoid committing these sins (and maybe let others know when they commit these sins too). They’ve created a hilarious video (see below) that exhorts us all to be on our best behavior.

The Copycat

You’ve done all the hard work of getting there early and painstakingly setting up the ideal shot. Then what happens? Another photographer gets up in your space to try and replicate the shot you’ve tried so hard to get. What’s even worse is when the offender proclaims that they’re a photographer too and that you should check out their work!

The Chatty Cathy